Justice is Sacred Heart University’s 2014 Summer Reading Book

Sacred Heart University’s Class of 2018 will all read Michael J. Sandel’s Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? before beginning classes in the fall. Intended “to prepare [students] for the start of their college careers and for the academic realities of college life,” the Summer Reading is considered the first assignment of each student’s college education.

The book will be on syllabuses in First-Year Seminars in various disciplines including English, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Psychology, and Political Science, and in certain sections of FLO 125: The Art of Thinking, a class focused on the essentials of logic and critical thinking.

Beyond the classroom, students will take part in “a series of faculty-led discussions on Justice and its potential impact on [their] lives both as students and as citizens.” Michael Sandel will speak at Sacred Heart in September.

The university is also holding a Summer Reading Essay Contest. First-year students may participate by writing a response to the prompt:

As you enter college and after reflecting on your reading of Justice, what can you learn from this book that might be significant as you begin this new chapter in your life?  Our Common Core asks us to consider how we might live lives of meaning and purpose.  From reading the text and considering the issues and complexities Sandel presents, how might it offer us some guidance—or perhaps some warning—as we embark on our personal journeys toward lives of meaning and purpose?

Click here to see the other schools that have adopted Justice and other Popular Picks for common reading from Macmillan!

Justice • Farrar, Straus & Giroux Paperbacks • 320 pages

Meet Macmillan at #FYE14 in San Diego!

Macmillan Logo

Visit us in the Exhibit Hall at Booths 6 & 7!

Exhibit Hall Hours
Saturday, February 15
5:00pm – 7:45pm
Sunday, February 16
7:00am – 11:30am
1:30pm – 6:00pm
Monday, February 17
7:00am – 12:00pm

Join us for dinner with Michael J. Sandel!

Author of Justice and What Money Can’t Buy
Saturday, February 15 at 7:30pm
Click for more details

Join us for dinner with Robin Sloan!

Author of Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore
Monday, February 17 at 7:00pm
Click for more details

Say hello!

Join Macmillan & Michael Sandel for Dinner at the 2014 Conference on The First-Year Experience!

Will you be at the Annual Conference on The First-Year Experience, coming up in February 2014?

On the first evening of the conference, Macmillan will join HarperCollins, Knopf, and Penguin to host a dinner featuring Michael J. Sandel, author of Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do and What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets.

2014 fye dinner ad saturday jan 15

To RSVP, please visit one of the participating publishers’ booths when the exhibit hall opens on Saturday (5:00pm-7:30pm)!

Kennesaw State Selects Sandel’s Justice for the Second Year

Each year, the Department of First-Year Programs at Kennesaw State University selects a book that will be the common reader assigned in all First-Year Seminars. When they chose Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? for the 2012-2013 program, there were no plans to extend the selection over two years.

But the book was such a success that it’s been named the 2013-2014 common reader, as well.

Jim Davis, Assistant Professor of Theatre & Performance Studies and Chair of the Common Reader Selection Committee for the Department of First-Year Programs, writes, “the book worked so well with the class we decided to do it again . . . It’s served us really well.”

In the fall, first-year students will enroll in one of Kennesaw’s four First-Year Seminars: KSU 1101: Traditional Seminar, KSU 1111: Globally Focused Seminar, KSU 1121: Community Engagement Seminar, or KSU 1200: Leadership Development Seminar. Justice will be assigned reading in all of these classes.

Every new student takes a first-year seminar, either as an independent three-credit course or as part of a Learning Community, which is a group of “20-25 first-semester students who co-enroll in two or more courses that are linked together with a common theme.” These choices offer freedom and flexibility to a student body with diverse interests and goals, and all the seminars aim to develop students’ “life skills, strategies for academic success, campus and community connections, and foundations for global learning.”

For instance, Professor Davis’ seminar is part of a Learning Community for Theatre & Performance Studies majors. Last fall, he “used [Justice] as a starting point for a series of performances based on how the students were handling the election year.” Practicing “techniques of ethnography, theater-for-social-change and improvisational theater,” students produced performances pieces that reflected some of the specific issues and questions presented in the book as well as the reality of facing those issues and questions as young adults and new college students.

Re-Generation Initiative at Kennesaw State University from Kennesaw State on Vimeo.

In the past, KSU has also adopted Paul Loeb’s Soul of a Citizen and Ishmael Beah’s A Long Way Gone for the common reading program. Click here to see the other schools that have adopted these Popular Picks for common reading from Macmillan!

Justice • Farrar, Straus & Giroux Paperbacks • 320 pages

Sandel’s Justice is the Common Reader at Kennesaw State University

Michael J. Sandel’s Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? is the 2012 Common Reader at Kennesaw State University. In the fall, first-year students will enroll in one of four of Kennesaw’s First-Year Seminars: KSU 1101: The traditional seminar, KSU 1111: The globally-focused seminar, KSU 1121: The community service seminar, or KSU 1200: The leadership development seminar. Click here for details about the four different courses

Every first-year must take a seminar, either as an independent three-credit course or as part of a themed combination of courses called a Learning Community, but the choices offer freedom and flexibility.This curriculum is designed to appeal to a student body with diverse interests and goals, but all the seminars aim to develop students’ “life skills, strategies for academic success, campus and community connections, and foundations for global learning,” and Justice will be assigned reading in every class.

By reading the same book and discussing it in class, as well as attending related events on campus throughout the academic year, students will have a variety of opportunities to achieve KSU’s objectives for the program. They will:

  • gain reinforcement of the first-year seminar learning outcomes by participating in this program
  • engage in reading
  • join their peers in a common academic experience
  • be able to demonstrate a knowledge of academic, political, social, and world issues
  • explore the development of their individual identities
  • develop multicultural awareness

The Common Reader is an initiative of the KSU Department of First-Year Programs, a team of educators and administrators that also coordinates the First-Year Seminar and Learning Community programs and provides year-round support for the first-year class. One of their unique offerings is IT 2101: Computers and Your World, a digital literacy course for students who want to practice using and explore computing technologies.

Previous Common Readers at KSU include Paul Loeb’s Soul of a Citizen and Ishmael Beah’s A Long Way Gone. Click here to see the other schools that have adopted these Popular Picks for common reading from Macmillan!

Justice • Farrar, Straus & Giroux Paperbacks • 320 pages

St. John’s University’s 2011 Summer Reading Pick is Sandel’s Justice

Michael J. Sandel’s Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? is the 2011 Summer Reading selection at St. John’s University. All first-year students received a copy of the book from the university in July and read it over the summer.

This year, Justice will be a central text in SJU’s Discover New York curriculum. A course unique to St. John’s University, Discover New York welcomes students to both the university and the New York City communities with “an introduction to [the city] through the lens of a particular subject discipline. It focuses on the themes of immigration, race/ethnicity, religion, wealth and poverty, and the environment.” Discover New York combines many of the same classroom experiences as a traditional student success or college orientation course (writing, critical thinking, accessing information with different types of media, etc.) with dynamic firsthand experiences throughout New York City.

The university developed a comprehensive guide to teaching the book, incorporating information about primary resources, key terms and phrases, and some approaches to teaching the book from rhetorical, philosophical, cultural, national and international perspectives.

Justice will be the topic of several book discussions held throughout the fall and spring semesters. Additionally, the annual research competition sponsored by the St. John’s University Libraries and The Friends of the Library carried a related theme: Social Justice in the Real World. The competition is open to all undergraduates at SJU.

Previous summer reading books at St. John’s include Triangle, Katharine Weber’s novel based on the devastating fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in New York City in 1911.

Justice • Farrar, Straus & Giroux Paperbacks • 320 pages

Justice is the 2011 Common Reading Book at Case Western Reserve University

Case Western Reserve University has chosen Michael J. Sandel’s Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? for the 2011 Common Reading Program.  Members of the incoming Class of 2015 will all receive a copy of the book when they visit campus for three-day New Student Orientation in July and August.

Students will read the book this summer, and they’ll have the opportunity to enter the annual Common Reading Program Essay Contest by responding to this prompt:

In your own words, describe the purpose(s) of American universities. Then, using some of the philosophical perspectives examined in Michel J. Sandel’s Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? decide if these purposes are just.

The winners, who’ll be announced in the fall, will receive a $300 University Bookstore gift certificate!

In August, first-years will return to campus for Welcome Days, a time for new students, and returning upperclassmen, as well, to connect and reconnect with the Case community through academic and social programming.

In addition to Meet the Faculty seminars, practical campus info sessions, a community service day called Case Connects!, and social activities like a Welcome Back Dance and an all-campus concert, new students will gather in small groups to discuss Justice during their first Share the Vision event.

Share the Vision is an ongoing initiative to “promote a just and humane campus for all.”  For 21 years, Case has been striving, as a campus community, to:

  • support the worth and dignity of each individual
  • respect new ideas and encourage examination and discussion of differing opinions
  • appreciate and enjoy our rich cultural, ethnic and racial diversity
  • reach for excellence and integrity in teaching, scholarship, research and service
  • promote justice and compassion on our campus and in our world
Through annual events like MLK Week, the Faculty/Staff vs. Student Basketball Game, and the Student Leadership Awards, and weekly events like non-traditional SatCo (short for Saturday College) experiential courses and workshops, and Community Hour forums, Case supports and celebrates the same principles that Michael Sandel writes about in Justice.

The author will visit Case and give the keynote address at University Convocation.  Here, Professor Sandel puts justice in terms of flutes, golf, and same-sex marriage at the TED2010 Conference in February 2010.

(For a quick snapshot of the twenty-minute lecture, watch at 7:30-8:45 when the audience joins Sandel in a debate about the 2001 Supreme Court case PGA Tour, Inc. v. Martin.)

Last year, the Class of 2014 read Elizabeth Royte’s Bottlemania for the CWRU Common Reading Program.  The book tied in with the campus-wide Year of Water effort, during which the university implemented new and enduring water conservation measures and was recognized regionally and nationally for its accomplishments.

Justice • Farrar, Straus & Giroux Paperbacks • 320 pages