Join us for the Macmillan Author Lunch at #FYE17 in Atlanta!

Monday, February 13 • 11:30 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.    
Atlanta Marriott Marquis | Atrium Level, Rooms A601/602
Lunch and author panel, with a book signing to follow

This event is free! (RSVP is required—click here!)

Featuring

white rageCarol Anderson
author of
White Rage
The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide
Bloomsbury USA | About the Book

city of thornsBen Rawlence
author of
City of Thorns
Nine Lives in the World’s Largest Refugee Camp
Picador USA | About the Book

mindwareRichard E. Nisbett
author of
Mindware
Tools for Smart Thinking
Farrar, Straus & Giroux | About the Book

adnans storyRabia Chaudry
author of
Adnan’s Story
The Search for Truth and Justice After Serial
St. Martin’s Press | About the Book

THIS I BELIEVE II is Tennessee Tech University’s 2016 #CommonReading Book!

Tennessee Technological University has selected This I Believe II as their 2016 Common Read Book!

All incoming first-year students are required to read This I Believe II this fall, and other university and community members are also invited to participate. Each first-year student will receive a copy of the book in their University Connections course in the fall.

In addition to participating in classroom discussions about This I Believe II‘s themes, students will also have the opportunity to meet Dan Gediman when he visits Tennessee Tech in the fall. Gediman will give a keynote speech discussing his role in the preparation and selection of essays for This I Believe and This I Believe II, and he will host a mini-workshop to assist students in developing their own “This I Believe” essay. Following the workshop and the completion of their “This I Believe” essays, students will be invited to submit their essays for inclusion in Tennessee Tech’s own “This I Believe” collection. The essay collection will be published after the fall semester.

Sister Helen Prejean, who contributed an essay to This I Believe IIis also expected to be on campus in the fall as part of Tennessee Tech’s Center Stage lecture series. Additional events are still being planned and more information is to come.

This I Believe II was selected for Tennessee Tech’s Common Book program primarily because of its diverse array of narratives, perspectives, and experiences. “We feel This I Believe II allows readers to experience a variety of events, cultures, and different beliefs through relatively short essays,” explained Allen Mullis, Common Book committee chair and director of Orientation and Student Success. “Unlike previous Common Book selections, students can open up any page and begin reading essays from people of all walks of life.”

This is the fifth year of Tennessee Tech’s Common Book program. Each year, a book is selected by a committee of faculty and staff, who read a selection of books that have been submitted through an online form. All university community members are able to submit book suggestions. The primary goal of this program is to create a shared reading experience for all incoming first-year students, faculty, and many university community members. The Common Book program also seeks to:

  • Challenge students to broaden their personal perspectives through participation in a university and community-wide conversation.
  • Introduce students to contemporary global issues.
  • Develop intellectual engagement inside and outside of the classroom.
  • Create a foundation for students to explore values and ethics.
  • Provide an introduction to the educational experience at Tennessee Tech.

Click here to see other schools that have adopted This I Believe IIand its predecessor, This I Believe. Visit our Popular Picks page for more common reading options from Macmillan!

This I Believe II • Picador • 288 pages

CITY OF THORNS is one of East Lansing and Michigan State University’s 2016 #CommonReading Selections! (#FYE16)

City of ThornsThe City of East Lansing and Michigan State University have selected Ben Rawlence’s City of Thorns as one of the books for their 2016 One Book, One Community program!

All incoming first-year students are required to read City of Thornsas well as the program’s other pick, Sonia Nazario’s Enrique’s Journey—before arriving on campus in the fall. City of Thorns will be used in numerous classes and residence hall activities, and it will be the subject of a variety of city-campus programs and special events. Each year, the program also brings the authors to the community and to Michigan State University to welcome the new first-year students to campus. Ben Rawlence will visit the East Lansing community in mid-September. More details on his visit and other events are to come.

The theme of this year’s One Book, One Community program is “Faces of Migration: The Human Experience,” and it focuses on the emotions and personal experiences of individuals on migration journeys. City of Thorns was ultimately selected because the program felt that the book is”vivid” and “illuminating,” it tackles topics that are relevant to both students and the general community, and it fits the selected theme; the book interweaves the stories of nine individuals living in the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya.

The purpose of the One Book, One College program is to encourage the Michigan State University and surrounding East Lansing community to read the same books, and come together to explore the books’ themes and issues. It is one of the first community reads programs to bring together students from a major university and the residents of its surrounding community. The program seeks to build an intellectual and social rapport among students and community members through the collective experience of reading, thinking, and discussing challenging ideas and themes that tackle important social issues. Additionally, the program strives to provide Michigan State University’s incoming first-year students with a shared learning experience that introduces them to the intellectual rigor of college-level academics.

Click here for more information on other Popular Picks for common reading from Macmillan!

City of Thorns • Picador • 352 pages

BEING MORTAL is UNC-Chapel Hill’s 2016 Carolina #SummerReading Book! (#CommonReading)

Being MortalThe University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has selected Atul Gawande’s Being Mortal for their 2016 Carolina Summer Reading program!

All incoming first-year and transfer students are expected to read the book over the summer and participate in small group discussions on the Monday before fall 2016 classes begin. The book is available for purchase in the campus bookstore.

Being Mortal was selected as the 2016 Carolina Summer Reading book by a nine-person committee consisting of faculty, staff, and students. Over the last several months, the Committee narrowed down the initial pool of 169 book nominations to seven finalists. Out of the seven finalists, Being Mortal was the Committee’s unanimous first choice.

UNC-Chapel Hill explained that they selected Being Mortal for a variety of reasons, including that the book is “well-written, it honors human diversity and success, and it is a celebration of life that challenges readers to respect human dignity.” However, the school’s committee ultimately chose this book because they felt that it addresses issues in medical and health sciences with a multidisciplinary lens that makes it relevant for a variety of majors, and it tackles topics that have not received enough opportunities for dialogue.

The school also felt that the book is an important read for students because it touches on universal topics that transcend generational divides, economic status, sexual orientation, racial identities, and gender identities. Tim Marr—distinguished associate professor of American Studies and chair of the Committee—explained that the Committee hopes that reading Being Mortal will help students confront death (the book’s primary theme) by “encouraging open discussion about important matters faced by every family for which medicine can ultimately provide no answer.”

The Carolina Summer Reading program aims to stimulate critical thinking outside of the classroom, and give new students common intellectual ground. It is used as an academic icebreaker, and it encourages students to engage with the scholarly community and come to their own conclusions about the material.

The UNC-Chapel Hill community was already familiar with Atul Gawande because he was the school’s 2014 Commencement Speaker. His Commencement speech confronted the graduating crowd with a story of children suffering from cancer. Yet, his message ultimately focused on the resources of strength and resilience people find to flourish in life—despite adversity—by connecting with a purpose larger than themselves that aids others.

Click here to see other schools that have adopted Being Mortaland other Popular Picks for common reading from Macmillan!

Being Mortal • Metropolitan Books • 304 pages

 

SPARE PARTS is Kansas State University’s 2016 #CommonReading Book! (#FYE16)

Spare PartsKansas State University has selected Joshua Davis’s Spare Parts for their 2016 Common Reading Experience program!

All matriculating first-year students (approximately 4,000) will receive a copy of Spare Parts from the university, and will read the book before heading to campus in the fall. Once they arrive on campus, students will engage in classroom discussions about the book in their first-year seminar classes.

Beyond the classroom, students will attend a variety of events related to the book. Joshua Davis will hold an on-campus public lecture on Oct. 6 at 7 p.m., and there will also be a public lecture series by members of the Kansas State community.

Spare Parts was read and reviewed by the K-State Book Network selection committee, which is comprised of 42 faculty, and students and staff from 18 colleges and units. Each year, the selection process entails a vote from the selection committee, a general campus vote (community members are able to vote online), and the Committee Provost’s approval. Out of the three books that made it to the final round of voting, Spare Parts was the overwhelming top choice.

The motto of the K-State Book Network is “A campus on the same page.” Kansas State University’s purpose behind its Common Reading Experience program (K-State First) is to provide a unifying experience to help first year students transition from high school to college. This is accomplished by using the book as the students’ shared experience, and the book is used to facilitate guided academic and social activities.

With universal themes like education and overcoming insurmountable odds as underdogs, Spare Parts was selected, in part, because the committee and K-State community believe that it is a book that will resonate with a diverse student body. “We believe every major, from engineering to English, will find something to connect with in the book,” explained Tara Coleman, chair of K-State Book Network and associate professor, K-State Libraries.

Click here to see other schools that have adopted Spare Parts, and other Popular Picks for common reading from Macmillan!